Olloclip adds new dimensions to iPhone photography

On a recent trip to the US I bought myself an Olloclip, a tiny set of lenses designed to be used with the iPhone 4 and 4S.

The Olloclip, like its name suggests, is a quick-connect lens system which clips over the iPhone’s rear-facing camera, allowing you to take wide-angle, macro, and fisheye shots.

No Lens

No Lens

Wide Angle

Wide Angle

Fish-Eye

Fish-Eye

Macro

Macro

It comes with its own microfibre pouch for cleaning and safe keeping.

Check out the Olloclip website for prices and purchasing info.

[Disclaimer: I’ve not received a cent from either Olloclip or Apple for this post.]

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iPad Photography Apps

I picked up an iPad a few weeks ago and have been exploring its possibilities. I have to say I’m pretty impressed so far. It’s simply amazing for looking at content, and is pretty bloody handy when it comes to creating it as well. There are some awesome apps out there which are great for photographers.

At some point I’ll write something about the apps I’ve been using, but in particular Snapseed and Flickr Studio.

I’ve attached an example of what you can do with Snapseed.

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[Shot with a Nikon D7000, processed with Snapseed for iPad]

Detached Photography??

I’m reading The Joke’s Over, a book by Ralph Steadman, artist & frequent collaborator with Hunter S Thompson. Many of Ralph’s drawings have accompanied Hunter’s writings and are somewhat famous in their own right.Outlining the first assignment Ralph and Hunter shared, covering the Kentucky Derby in 1970, Ralph describes the reason Hunter wanted someone to draw the scenes at the event instead of having someone photograph them.

“He had been used to working with photographers on other assignments and the detachment with which a photographer usually works gave him nothing against which he could spark.”

I was somewhat taken aback by this because I fail to see how a photographer could be detached, unable to engage with the subject in some manner. It wasn’t until I read the above quote a few times that I realised there must be some subconscious part of my brain that registers something in every shot I take. I truly don’t know on a conscious/thinking level why I take most of the shots I do. Something about the scene appeals to me whether it contain beauty, ugliness, hope, despair, light, shadow….

I don’t even think of it as “capturing” the moment. More like “leasing” it from the Universe so I can share it with other people.